• Dedications

    One of my favorite parts of experiencing a book–whether it’s a nineteenth century treatise, or a trashy beach novel–is reading the dedication page.  I always wonder how much time and effort the author puts into deciding who gets the honor of the dedication (and of course, thinking about who I will dedicate my dissertation to…) and am at times… Continue Reading

  • Fitting For Health

    In September, I’ll be in Paris, presenting at what is sure to be an amazing conference. The “Fitting for Health: The Economy of Medical Technology in Europe and its Colonies, 1600-1850,” will be held on 2-3 September at the École normale supérieure and Académie nationale de médecine. Here is the conference description: Is the history… Continue Reading

  • UTSIC

    In this blog post, I want to share one of the projects I’ve been involved with: The University of Toronto Scientific Instruments Collection (UTSIC), a volunteer project at the Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology, to catalogue, collect, and maintain all of the university’s scientific instruments collection. Several graduate students who… Continue Reading

  • Who is John Harrison Curtis (1778-1856)?

    My research into aural surgery began accidentally when I was struggling to find a focus for my Fundamentals in the History of Medicine paper. Coming from a philosophy background, my first year as a graduate student was filled with struggles, extreme stress, and frustration, as I tried to stop writing “like a philosopher” and began… Continue Reading

  • Reading Artifacts: Summer Institute in Material Culture Research

    For one week last August, I had the pleasure at participating the inaugural launch of “Reading Artifacts: Summer Institute in Material Culture Research,” hosted by and located at the Canada Science and Technology Museum in Ottawa, Ontario. Bringing together scholars and experts from all over the world, the Summer Institute aimed to break new ground on approaching… Continue Reading